Doria Bill To Provide Property Tax Deferment For Deployed Military

TRENTON – A bill sponsored by Senator Joseph V. Doria which would provide a property tax deferment for enlisted members of the Armed Forces in the event that they are deployed for active duty in a time of war was approved by the Senate Community and Urban Affairs Committee by a vote of 4-0.

“Our brave men and women serving on the front lines defending American liberty and freedom abroad deserve a little consideration in terms of everyday life back home,” said Senator Doria, D-Hudson, who also serves as Mayor of Bayonne. “In New Jersey, property taxes are one of the biggest burdens of everyday life, and our military families have enough to worry about, given the dangers their loved ones face in times of war. This bill would allow military families to put off paying property taxes until after our soldiers are safe back at home.”

The bill, S-1235, would provide that military personnel be entitled to a local property tax deferment during their time of deployment to a theater of war. Under the legislation, the deferment would begin on the first tax date due after deployment, and would end 90 days after a soldier’s return. During the time of deferment, no interest would be charged on the unpaid property taxes, and the State would pay municipalities for the cost of property taxes plus 2%. Municipalities would then reimburse the State when payments are made by the taxpayer.

“We want to make life as easy as possible for military families that are living on edge and constantly worrying about the safety of their loved ones,” said Senator Doria. “As the old saying goes, ‘War is Hell,’ and local officials should not exacerbate the situation by adding financial burdens to the laundry list of other concerns for military families. With this legislation, we’re giving these families and our soldiers the space they need during very trying personal times, to serve America’s military in times of war.”

The bill now heads to the Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee, before going to the full Senate for review.